Kit & Kin Biodegradable Nappy Review

We normally use cloth nappies and disposable nappies combined – luckily my eldest is already toilet trained, so it’s a lot less nappy changes on a daily basis. With all the nappy changes we go through with each and every child, we add another about 6.500 disposable diapers to that already huge environmental impact what we create by using very convenient disposable diapers. That’s more than 8.000.000 nappies a day in the UK only. The conventional nappies really take their time to decompose: a few hundred years, scientists reckon SOMETHING IN THE RANGE OF 200-500 years. They are one of the largest contributors to landfill. Then, chulk up all the water waste during production too. Oh, and add all the bleaches, fragrances and colorants which are used when manufacturing big label nappies.

Luckily nowadays we can buy biodegradable nappies too and we have just tested a great new brand: Kit & Kin, co-founded by Emma Bunton. I always thought they are all very clever. Look at all the Spice Girls now. Entrepreneurs, mumtrepeneurs, producers, designers, also volunteers, UNICEF ambassadors, campaigners. That’s girl power for you! So, Emma’s little son suffered with eczema and she struggled to find baby products without harsh chemicals, and that’s how the idea of Kit & Kin was born.

In the last few days we’ve been testing their nappies, and here’s why we loved them:

  • They are a perfect fit. My little girl currently wears size 4 nappies, so the sizing is correct.
  • They are durable, lasted all night, no leakage at all. We also dealt with a little bit of teething lately, but the nappies are proved to be diarrhoea safe too.
  • I love the design! So simple and cute. Just a cute animal face on the back and nothing else. Why waste all that coloring? They are just diapers.
  • The nappies (as well as the packaging) will biodegrade within only 3 to 6 years.
  • Kit & Kin is an ethical company: after every 10 Kit & Kin nappy subscriptions one acre of rainforest is being purchased through the World Land Trust.

The single pack of each sizes cost £9.99, which is the same as other biodegradable brands. With a monthly subscription though, you can save up to 25%.

Disclaimer: I received this product for my honest and unbiased review.

The Pramshed

15 Comments

  1. Do you know where these are available? We mostly use cloth as disposables make my son come out in a horrible rash. So these might be perfect for him! Will have a look round! #HumpDayLinky
    Laura recently posted…Food: Dairy-Free Kids MenuMy Profile

  2. I do like the sound of these. It scared me the amount of rubbish including nappies that go to landfill. All nappy brands should follow suit x
    #fortheloveofblog

  3. These sound fab, we used reusables for the first six months but she outgrew them before we could afford to replace them and I haven’t found a suitable alternative yet so these look promising!
    #stayclassymama

  4. Wow I can’t believe the amount of nappies that are sent to landfill, that’s such a huge number. I do feel bad for it, and I’m not one of these mothers who change their child’s nappy every few hours. I will be taking a look at these nappies. Thanks so much for linking up at #fortheloveofBLOG. Claire x
    The Pramshed recently posted…20 signs that show you are a bloggerMy Profile

  5. We really tried to do our bit for the environment by using cloth nappies but I just couldn’t get on with them and I was gutted after spending quite a lot of money. I love that there are now eco-friendly alternatives and this is only the second or third brand I’ve heard that offer them. I don’t know why more nappy manufacturers aren’t doing more to reduce what’s going to landfill. Surely they must feel they have a responsibility, you know, other than lining their pockets! x

    • I don’t understand that either. I mean it cannot be that expensive to manufacture them. Especially if you compare the prices.

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