herbs

How to Grow Popular Herbs: Guide and Tips

In Home & Garden by eva.katona@yahoo.com2 Comments

This is a collaborative post.

There are so many reasons to love and grow your own herbs. You don’t even have to have a garden, even a small patio or a balcony can be home to them. Enchanting walkways, sophisticated meals (fresh herbs are the best! No dried herbs compare to them) and they even make the bees very happy – so planting them will help to save the bees and will get the best out of your cooking.

In this post I’m sharing you some tips how to grow the most popular herbs as well as a graphic guide by Trago to make planting, caring and harvesting easier.

How to Grow Popular Herbs: Guide and Tips

Basil

This herb has to be replanted every year, so you can choose a different variety every year. Tip: pinch the top two sets of leaves once the basil plant reaches reasonable height. This gives you a much higher quality plant.

Rosemary

 
Chives

Chives are super easy to grow, they will survive and almost any area but the happiest in warm soil and sunlight. Do not cut more than half of the chive when harvesting otherwise it might harm the plant. Tip: did you know that thechive flowers are edible so it can be added to your salad or as part of the food styling.

Thyme

Probably the most important to know about this herb that it’s intolerant to too much water, so the best is to protect plants in pots from excessive winter wet by placing them indoors or a dry place. Tip: the more you trim your thyme, the more it grows.

Dill

Dill likes lots of water and has to be protected from wind as it grows up tall. An ideal spot might be up against a wall or fence so that the wind cannot knock the plant over. Tip: the seeds themselves are also useful and can be used in cooking –  as an ingredient in curry powder for example.

Sage

Interestingly, sage seeds are slow germinators: often not all seeds will germinate and the ones that do may take up to 6 weeks. Plants can get woody and stop producing lots of branches after 3 to 5 years. At this point, you may want to dig up your original and plant a new one. Tip: Plant it near carrots,strawberries or tomatoes.

herb growing guide

Comments

  1. This post is perfect – we are starting our own herb and vegetable garden. We are complete newbs to this so hopefully this helps us gain our green fingers xx

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